The NSA Broke the Social Contract with the Tech World

Dilma Rousseff, the president of historically US-friendly Brazil, lashed out against the US government for their intrusion of her personal privacy, on the privacy of her government’s corporations, and on the privacy of Brazil’s citizens. She’s proposing some interesting and real-world solutions that will take some of the power away from the U.S. and possibly back into the hands of world internet users. Despite this, I believe that the biggest fallout that the NSA faces is their loss of trust with young technocrats, technologists, and engineers. Perhaps Rousseff’s idea of a UN branch to deal with internet freedom will materialize …

In Response to the Supporters of PRISM

Perhaps I am sensitive to privacy intrusion after my family enjoyed some of the “benefits” of a totalitarian-esque communist state. Perhaps my hatred of big-brother solidified after reading (and re-reading) George Orwell’s 1984. Or, perhaps, it’s just common sense. Last week validated the vilified Assange and his Cyberpunks thesis: big-brother is watching your every step. Yes, you’ve all read the details about how the NSA has agreements with (at least) Verizon, Google, Microsoft, Yahoo, Facebook, Pal Talk, Youtube, Skype, AOL, and Apple. But I’m not writing this article to go over the details of the program nor how expansive it …